Permanganate Oxidizable Carbon Reflects a Processed Soil Fraction that is Sensitive to Management

Author: Steve Culman et al
Date:  March–April 2012
Abstract: Permanganate oxidizable C (POXC; i.e., active C) is a relatively new method that can quantify labile soil C rapidly and inexpensively. Despite limited reports of positive correlations with particulate organic C (POC), microbial biomass C (MBC), and other soil C fractions, little is known about what soil fractions POXC most closely re!ects. We measured POXC across a wide range of soil types, ecosystems, and geographic areas (12 studies, 53 total sites, n = 1379) to: (i) determine the relationship between POXC and POC, MBC and soil organic C (SOC) fractions, and (ii) determine the relative sensitivity of POXC as a labile soil C metric across a range of environmental and management conditions.
Source: SSSAJ: Volume 76: Number 2

From Jude Maul

I am currently attending an intensive eExtension writing group in Annapolis, MD.  We were each invited to submit at least one extension write-up on grain production.  I have started writing a short article “Introduction and Current Research in Perennial Wheat”.  If anyone has references, self-references (with a little blurb about the work you are citing), preliminary data and any-other information you would like to contribute.  If you contribute to writing or editing then you can be listed as an author.  The article will eventually be published on eXtension (www.extension.org/) and can considered as an extension publication.  Please send me any information that may be useful for this write-up, to Jude.maul@gmail.com
Jude Maul
Research Ecologist
USDA-ARS
Sustainable Agriculture Systems Lab
Building 001, rm 140
Beltsville, Maryland 20770

Perennial Wheatgrass at Beltsville Agricultural Research Center

Author: Jude Maul
Affiliation: USDA-ARS – Sustainable Agriculture Systems Lab
Abstract: This presentation illustrates research conducted on perennial grasses in the Maryland area – specifically looking to answer if soybeans can be used as a mid-summer weed control and source of fertility (nitrogen) in fall for perennial grains.
Source: http://pwheat.anr.msu.edu/upload_max_filesize=32m/2012/01/Beltsville-perennial-wheat1.pdf